Did you hear this?

Mentoring, Parenting, Seminars-Webinars No Comments

I am so excited about our new Free Homeschool Webinar series.  Here’s the feedback we got:

I appreciated the emphasis on mastery of skills. Of course, I want my teens to master driving, not just pass a list of minimum requirements!
Lisa Clark

Alot of useful information… We need to train right the first time.
Kari Durfee

An excellent way to teach a teen to be aware of what they’re doing when they are driving.
Marta Klass

Patrick Barrett gave a wealth of information on Thursday.  He shared specific tips & strategies you could implement today.  If you want to be notified of our April Free Homeschool Webinar, here’s where you can sign up:

 

Wednesday Words: “Parents: Should You Complain?”

Mentoring, Moms, Parenting 4 Comments

I was reviewing some notes from a previous sermon when I read the following: The Israelites were told to be quiet as they walked around Jericho, but it is hard when their parents only complained & grumbled.  At first, I thought the comment was about parents today, but then I remembered it was about the Israelites.

complaint

Let’s face it. those words are just as much an issue today as they were with the Israelites.  I am pondering how much I complain and the impact it has on my own children.  Unfortunately, I complain or have negative comments often.  Yesterday, I was praying about my words to be positive and uplifting, so this fits right into what I need to change in my life.  I am trusting the Holy Spirit to change my words so they have a righteous impact on those around me.

Do all things without complaining and disputing, that you may become blameless and harmless, children of God without fault in a crooked & perverse generation, among whom you shine as lights in the world.  Philippians 2:14-15

Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy – meditate on these things.  Philippians 4:8

These verses are the ones I will be mediating on this week to keep my mind focused on Godly thoughts & words.  Will you join me this week in memorizing & meditating on your words & thoughts?

Even though my kids are grown, my words still have an impact on them.  I can change my pattern of complaining and speaking negatively.  What will you do to have a positive, Biblical impact on your kids?

Wednesday Words: Showing More Grace

Bible, Marriage, Mentoring, Moms 2 Comments

Originally, I planned to write what God is teaching me about the beatitudes today.  But, I’ve been reading 2 Samuel in the mornings and decided to write about showing more grace.

When David returns to Israel, after his son Absalom is killed, David encounters a variety of men.  One of these men is Shimei, who cursed David, the Lord’s annointed one.  Shimei tells David, “I have sinned. . . I am the first to come today of all the house of Joseph to go down to meet the lord the king.”  David’s men ask for permission to slay Shimei since he cursed David.

What does David do when he could have Shimei killed for just reasons?

…He showed mercy!

Shimei did not deserve mercy, but David showed mercy.

david-absalomMephibosheth rushes to meet David as well.  Earlier in the book, it appeared that Mephibosheth, Jonathan’s son, had deserted David.  At least that’s the story the servant tells David.  We learn that Mephibosheth was deceived.  Mephibosheth was actually faithful to David, not trimming his moustache or washing his clothes the entire time David was kicked out of Jerusalem. David extends grace to Mephiboseth and gives back the land.

Finally, Barzillai comes to meet King David.  Barzillai is about 80 years old, with not much time left to live.  Barzillai provided David with supplies while David fought Absalom.  David asks Barzillai to cross the Jordan to live with the king, but Barzillai refuses.  He would rather live his last few years at home.  Instead, David extends the same grace to his servant, Chimham.  Chimham doesn’t deserve to David’s kindness, but David exhibits grace to him.

As I read these stories, I ask myself how often I show grace and mercy to those around me.

Am I merciful & gracious to my husband?

…Or do I nag him?

Do I show mercy to my kids?

…Or do I make them “tow the line” which leads to legalism?

Do I extend grace to my friends?

…Or am I critical of the way they handle a situation?

One question I am asking myself is this, “What do my kids hear me talk about?”  If I’m always complaining about the way things are going at church, I am not showing mercy.  If I’m complaining about the way my husband handles a situation with our kids, I am not being gracious.  If I’m complaining about the kids, I’m not being Christlike.

Do all things without complaining and disputing, that you may become blameless and harmless, children of God….as lights in the world.  Philippians 2:13-14

Lastly, I’m reminded how often God is merciful to me when I fail him.  How gracious he is when I sin against him.  I am quickly reminded how important it is to be merciful and gracious to those around me.

Do your kids reach BEYOND themselves to help others?

Bible, Homeschooling, Mentoring No Comments

I wrote this a year ago, but it struck me the other day so I’m posting it again. Enjoy
Kerry
—————– 

Yesterday’s sermon was thought provoking, not necessarily because of the application, but some interesting insights in the passage. The text was Matthew 8 where Jesus heals the leper, the centurion’s servant and Peter’s mother-in-law.

Peter Leithart showed this passage as one of a pattern in which Matthew shows Jesus’ miracles, followed by an explanation of Jesus’ ministry and finally a “call to discipleship” If you read Matthew 8-10, you will see this pattern repeated in Matt 8:1-22, Matt 8:23-9:17 and Matt 9:18-10:42.

Within Matthew 8, we see several applications that I want to teach my own children and learn these myself.

1. Do you really believe?
The leper comes to Jesus believing he can be healed as he says, “Lord, if You are willing, You can make me clean.”

Do you really believe God can heal your problems, whether they are physical, job-related, familial, marital, financial? Can God really heal your situation?

2. Will you help anyone in need, even the wierdos around you?

Jesus does not withdraw from the outcast. In fact, he touches the unclean. Jews at this time would have nothing to do with lepers and were usually repulsed by them. In a few short sentences, it’s difficult to convey the distain that society had for lepers.  On the other hand, Jesus shows us how we ought to treat the outcasts around us.

Does God ever place people in your life that turn your stomach? You know, you really don’t want to be around them because they are weird.

3. Will you help those who might come back & hurt you?
Not only is the leper an outcast, the centurion is also an outcast to the Jewish community. Most Jews would not help him during this time period. Think about it, the centurion is a Gentile, a Roman, a military commander (against the Jews). In the near future, he might call up his troops to destroy the Jews. Ironically, Jesus declares, “I have not found such great faith, not even in Israel.” This Roman centurion has more faith than the Jews, God’s chosen people.

Jesus heals the centurion’s servant with just a word. He knew the times were changing from Jews to Gentiles. He also elevated the Roman centurion above the Jews due to his faith.

4. Jesus is the only solution to your problems.
After these miracles are described, Matthew reminds us of Isaiah’s words.
“He Himself took our infirmities And bore our sickness.” This often refers to Christ taking your sins upon the cross, but it also refers to Jesus taking our infirmities, weaknesses and disease upon Himself.

Discipleship is not just about “you” being saved & healed; it’s about you being healed so you can go be a healer, too. When you are saved, you are caught up in Christ’s river of life. So much so, that you can’t help yourself to reach out and “heal” those in need around you.

5. What model of discipleship will you follow?
After modeling discipleship to His disciples, Matthew further explains the cost of being Christ’s discipleship. When one of his disciples asked Jesus if he could “first go and bury (his) father”, Jesus tells him to “Follow Me”. I’ve often thought this man’s dad just died and Jesus won’t even let him bury him properly. This isn’t really the case. If that man’s dad had just died, he would not be talking to Jesus but instead making funeral preparations. This disciple wanted to care for his dad in old age and then follow Jesus Christ. Taking care of the elderly was very important to Jews, so he was following the pattern of those around him.

What we learn in this story is that even good & right family obligations must be put aside to follow Jesus Christ. Following Jesus trumps all other obligations.

Are you reaching out to the outcast, those you think are weirdos in your life?
Are you modeling this so your children will help those around them, too?
Are you placing Jesus Christ above all other obligations?
Or, do you put Him on the back burner so you can give your kids the best 

Support our Wounded Troops

Kerry Beck, Mentoring No Comments

I’ve been watching tv for about an hour each afternoon while I stretch my back.  I usually watch a cooking show and today it was Emeril Live.

Emeril’s entire show was a support to the US troops.  He had a cooking contest with the military.  The marine that won talked about a cookbook that had his steak recipe.  All proceeds from A Salute to Steak go to the care of wounded marines.  So far they have raised over $400,000 with their goal being $500,000.

I immediately googled wounded warrior center recipe book to find that cookbook. (I couldn’t remember the exact name)  I ordered a copy and I encourage you to order a copy, too!  I don’t promote charities much on this blog, but this is a way to help take care of men & women who are serving us around the country…without charging taxes.   That’s my way of paying the bills.

Go get your copy right now at Command of the Grill:  A Salute to Steak and know the profits go to helping wounded soldiers.

Kerry

ps.  If you think $10 is expensive for this recipe book, consider it a donation to a great cause.

pps.  Let your kids pitch in for a family copy and you are modeling “charity” for them.

ppps.  The steak recipe Emeril cooked on his show looked delicious.  I plan to cook it once I get my cookbook.

Teaching Your Kids Discipleship

Bible, Mentoring, Moms, Raising Leaders No Comments

Yesterday’s sermon was thought provoking, not necessarily because of the application, but some interesting insights in the passage. The text was Matthew 8 where Jesus heals the leper, the centurion’s servant and Peter’s mother-in-law.

Peter Leithart showed this passage as one of a pattern in which Matthew shows Jesus’ miracles, followed by an explanation of Jesus’ ministry and finally a “call to discipleship” If you read Matthew 8-10, you will see this pattern repeated in Matt 8:1-22, Matt 8:23-9:17 and Matt 9:18-10:42.

Within Matthew 8, we see several applications that I want to teach my own children and learn these myself.

1. Do you really believe?
The leper comes to Jesus believing he can be healed as he says, “Lord, if You are willing, You can make me clean.”

Do you really believe God can heal your problems, whether they are physical, job-related, familial, marital, financial? Can God really heal your situation?

2. Will you help anyone in need, even the wierdos around you?

Jesus does not withdraw from the outcast. In fact, he touches the unclean. Jews at this time would have nothing to do with lepers and were usually repulsed by them. In a few short sentences, it’s difficult to convey the distain that society had for lepers.  On the other hand, Jesus shows us how we ought to treat the outcasts around us.

Does God ever place people in your life that turn your stomach? You know, you really don’t want to be around them because they are weird.

3. Will you help those who might come back & hurt you?
Not only is the leper an outcast, the centurion is also an outcast to the Jewish community. Most Jews would not help him during this time period. Think about it, the centurion is a Gentile, a Roman, a military commander (against the Jews). In the near future, he might call up his troops to destroy the Jews. Ironically, Jesus declares, “I have not found such great faith, not even in Israel.” This Roman centurion has more faith than the Jews, God’s chosen people.

Jesus heals the centurion’s servant with just a word. He knew the times were changing from Jews to Gentiles. He also elevated the Roman centurion above the Jews due to his faith.

4. Jesus is the only solution to your problems.
After these miracles are described, Matthew reminds us of Isaiah’s words.
“He Himself took our infirmities And bore our sickness.” This often refers to Christ taking your sins upon the cross, but it also refers to Jesus taking our infirmities, weaknesses and disease upon Himself.

Discipleship is not just about “you” being saved & healed; it’s about you being healed so you can go be a healer, too. When you are saved, you are caught up in Christ’s river of life. So much so, that you can’t help yourself to reach out and “heal” those in need around you.

5. What model of discipleship will you follow?
After modeling discipleship to His disciples, Matthew further explains the cost of being Christ’s discipleship. When one of his disciples asked Jesus if he could “first go and bury (his) father”, Jesus tells him to “Follow Me”. I’ve often thought this man’s dad just died and Jesus won’t even let him bury him properly. This isn’t really the case. If that man’s dad had just died, he would not be talking to Jesus but instead making funeral preparations. This disciple wanted to care for his dad in old age and then follow Jesus Christ. Taking care of the elderly was very important to Jews, so he was following the pattern of those around him.

What we learn in this story is that even good & right family obligations must be put aside to follow Jesus Christ. Following Jesus trumps all other obligations.

Are you reaching out to the outcast, those you think are weirdos in your life?
Are you modeling this so your children will help those around them, too?
Are you placing Jesus Christ above all other obligations?
Or, do you put Him on the back burner so you can give your kids the best education possible?

Discipleship Training

What Does Your Homeschool Look Like???

Mentoring, Raising Leaders 1 Comment

One of my goals in our homeschool this year is to mentor my children, instead of giving them a stack of books & workbooks to study.

When you think of mentoring, do you imagine a group of students around a teacher, spouting off words of wisdom? Many conjure up a scene with Socrates or Plato as they talk to their students. I’m sure we all have our own idea of what mentoring would look like.

I believe homeschooling is truly a mentoring process. Some homeschools look like a government classroom, with desks, posters on the wall, and a stack of textbooks to be read and examined each day.

My idea of homeschooling/mentoring is much different. Let me give you a little glimpse of mentoring in our home.

* Sitting on my daughter’s bedroom floor, discussing Dante’s Hell with both my girls – laughter included
* Sitting with my middle daughter each week, with my cup of tea, discussing the lectures and books for humanities
* Sitting on my daughter’s bed discussing which direction her research paper should go.
* Looking through support books about Jane Austen to guide my daughter with her research
* Discussing possible research topics and narrowing it down to three
* Sitting on the couch, reading about how the gospel has spread across the earth. Asking my son questions about today’s reading and past readings as he dribbles a basketball
* Sitting on the couch and looking over the shoulder of my daughter as she edits her own essay. A chance to discuss what is best.
Reading the same books my kids read silently so I can discuss them.
* Listening to my girl’s weekly lecture in the kitchen while I fix breakfast so I can discuss it with them later in the week.
* Reading & discussing the worldview of the medieveal era as we fold laundry
* Developing my child’s “interests” into a subject they can study in their high school years

    Take it easy and take advantage of informal times with your kids to discuss worldview, readings, and lectures they have heard recently.

    What other ways do you “mentor” your children?

    Kerry

    ps. Post a comment about how you mentor!!!

Keep Those Notes Organized…in a Fun Way!

Mentoring, Moms, Serving Others No Comments

OK…this is probably more for girls, but some guys might like it too. This is a really cool way to  organize your note cards. I started using note cards again this summer as I read the Bible and wanted to keep a record of specific topics about leadership. I’ve also used note cards to keep track of specific ideas we are studying.

Why not make this fun organizer to keep your notes?

I’ve included a link to all the directions, as well as another picture you can see to get a great idea of how to make this organizer.

Click here to get the directions:

Organizer Directions

Just print them out and start working with your children to make a great organizer.
If you decide not to do this for your own kids, why not make one for Grandma to keep her recipe cards organized?

Blessings,

Kerry

ps. all ideas & pics from splitcoaststampers.com

Boys who read Pride & Prejudice

Living Books & Classics, Love of Learning, Mentoring, Raising Leaders, Reading 5 Comments

The first book on my son’s reading list this year was Pride & Prejudice.  He was dreading it.

But I still remember a Sunday School teacher in Texas saying that is one of his favorite books.  Plus, one of our best friends wrote a book about Jane Austen.  The first chapter starts with something like, “Real Men Read Jane Austen”.  So, I figured he could handle it.

Well, he made it half-way through the book!

I guess that’s good, considering the murmuring around our house about the book.

Even though he didn’t finish the book, we had some great discussions.  Last night he told us he got to the part where Darcy asks Elizabeth to marry him the first time.  He went on to say that Elizabeth was just disgusting.  She made him so mad.

Well, I guess the book provoked emotion in my 14yo son.  Maybe not the same emotion my 17yo daughter & I had, but emotion nonetheless.

He went on to say that he couldn’t stand Elizabeth and the way she talked about people.  He couldn’t understand why she would say and the way she did.   I guess he hit upon some real truths about girls.

I was excited he had an opinion about the book.  When I talked to him about the book, he would barely discuss it with me.  Last night at dinner was the most lively discussion we’ve had.  That’s probably because his big sister kept quiet and let him talk about P & P for the first time.

Even if your kids don’t like a book, that’s okay.  Let them talk about it and express their feelings…especially if they are different from yours!

Kerry

ps.  What book will you be reading this week?  Will your kids have an opinion about it?

pps.  I just realized my non-reading son really does have opinions about our readings.  Just this morning, he stopped our read-aloud and asked why we had to read about geeks who liked school….We were reading about Louis Pasteur!

Hey, at least he was listening and taking it in!  Do your kids oppose your opinion?  That’s good because they are interacting with the text!

Teaching Classics

I Confess…

Living Books & Classics, Mentoring, Raising Leaders, Reading No Comments

I must confess that I don’t always live up to everything I encourage you to do.

You see, my hip and lower back have been giving me problems the past 2 weeks.  Since I’ve been in pain, I haven’t been able to keep up with my reading…shame on me!  Although I’ve read some, it is usually in bed before I fall asleep with the book on my lap :-)

I am sharing this to say that sometimes there are seasons of life when we can’t get it all done.  My plan is to get back into regular reading next week as we start a new literature book.

Hopefully, I will finish Pride & Prejudice this weekend while we are on the road.  My dd just finished it (again) yesterday.  My son only made it half-way through and I told him he could choose another book.  Even though he didn’t finish the book, he came away learning alot.  How do I know?  Read my next post!

Kerry

Mentor with classics 

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